All

For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23).

The word “all” is all inclusive – we all fall short of God’s flawless standard. Even the most righteous person, the most moral person, the most kind person.

It has less to do with a sinful act and more to do with our human nature. We are born egocentric. We are all bent toward selfishness and pride. In fact, every sinful act is a transgression against the first commandment, “You shall have no other gods before Me.”

That “other god” often times is me! How many times daily, do I think of my own comfort and desires. It seems hopeless unless we tap into a power greater than our human nature, a supernatural power. Only through the Holy Spirit who comes to us the moment we submit our life to Jesus Christ, can we overcome the dark areas of our human spirit. Only through the power of the Holy Spirit can we overcome the selfishness of our thoughts, emotions, and will.

Romans 3:22 tells us that we are made righteous with God by placing our faith in Jesus Christ. And this is true for everyone who believes, no matter who we are…

All

Advertisements

Faith vs Religion

Then you will know the truth and the truth shall set you free (John 8:32).

Whenever I am referred to as being religious, in my heart I feel insulted. I am not offended by the person who said it because most likely he/she meant it as a compliment, but I would prefer being thought of as a believer whose faith is in the Lord, Jesus Christ. To me, religion is man-made and filled with man-made restrictions.

Jesus Himself had nothing good to say about the religious. He called them vipers and described them as white-washed tombs.

Religion equals constraints, limitations, and the guilt that comes with never doing or being enough. Religion adds hundreds of thou-shalt-nots to the freedom and assurance that we can experience in living in the grace that is freely given though faith in Christ Jesus.

And if the Son sets you free, you will be free indeed.

Greater Love

Greater love has no man that he lay down his life for his friends (John 15:13).

We often hear bout heroic men who throw themselves on mines or grenades in order to save their brothers. Although most of us are not faced with situations that require a life-terminating decision, we can give our lives for others in other ways. Loving parents come to mind as they often sacrifice materially, and sometimes dreams and ambitions, for the greater good of their children.

Of course, the greatest love was shown by Christ Jesus when He allowed Himself to be unjustly accused, physically put to death, and worst of all, painfully separated from the Father as He bore the sins of both His friends and enemies as the perfect sacrifice of atonement. The Good Shepard gave His life for His sheep.

By this we know what love is.

Submission

Submit to one another out of reverence to Christ (Eph 5:21).

Our ladies’ group was discussing submission a few days ago and I was reminded of some of the principles that, as I saunter through the day, are so easy to disregard. I also realized that this topic and related scriptural references were ones that I had never written about—maybe because it is so volatile and misunderstood even among believers, and especially when dealing with less-than-perfect marriage relationships.

The goal of submission is not domination/subservience, but rather unity. And the path to unity is kindness, respect, honor and love—one to another.

Submission is lifting another up—not pulling or dragging, but lifting for the other’s greater good. That is so opposite of pride or even low self-esteem where we’re trying to make ourselves feel good, right, or knowledgeable.

Relationships always work best when we follow the instructions and guidelines of the Creator. And I personally think the connotations of the words arrogant and prideful are much more distasteful than that of one who serves out of love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to Vicki for suggesting practical applications

Turn to the Father

When you have eaten and are satisfied, praise the Lord your God for the good land He has given you. Be careful that you do not forget the Lord your God, failing to observe His commands (Deut. 8:10-16).

As a believer, when times of trouble come, I immediately turn to God. I stay in His presence whether I am totally focused on prayer or talking with Him while doing daily tasks. It’s easier to trust when we must, in situations where we have no control. But this is God’s desire in the good times, too.

God doesn’t enjoy our pain, in fact, it tears His heart too. In all their distress, He too was distressed (Isa 63:9a). Although He doesn’t initiate our suffering, He uses it to draw us into His fellowship so that He can dispense His love and mercy and bless us with His better plan.

When times are good, it is easier to lean on ourselves and forget the Giver of all good things. If I could only always be mindful of this and avoid what is documented time and time in scripture when pride led to destruction.

May His praise continually be on my lips.

Wasted Time

Then I will restore (make-up) to you the years that the locusts have eaten (Joel 2:25).

I love interpreting this verse metaphorically in order to apply it to my own life.

We have all had periods in our lives where we have wasted days, even years on being angry, or timid, or sulky, or fearful, or whiney, or even mentally checking-out. Later we regret those times especially if there is a person involved who is no longer with us.

In many instances a do-over is not possible, but God is able and can somehow compensate. He is so gracious to those who put their faith in Him, and with Him nothing is impossible. After all, it is not God that invades our peace, but it is He who can lead us to still waters and can more than satisfy the ache in our soul.

God is God

I am confident of this, that He who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus (Phil 1:6).

A devotional by Oswald Chambers had this phrase, “As sure as God is God and you are you…” It got me thinking about the vast chasm between God and my human nature—His pure heart, my selfish heart; His foresight, my myopic vision; His unconditional love, my fickle emotions.

Quite often, the way He answers prayer is different than the way I would (we can all be glad about that). The more I pray for someone who needs to change, even if it’s legitimate, the more the Holy Spirit spotlights areas in my life that need to change.

Anyway, I’m glad that God is God and that He is still working on me.