He Talks to Me Too

But when He, the Spirit of truth, comes, He will guide you into all the truth. He will not speak on His own; He will speak only what He hears (John 16:13a).

God speaks to every believer. Period. Sometimes His message hits us like a two-by-four. Other times it is still and quiet and we need to be still and quiet listening for it.

God speaks to us through His word. We may read the same passage over and over again through the years, and then one day, it jumps off the page and is totally relevant to our current situation.

God speaks to us through prayer. We may be praying for a miracle and He may answer by giving us instructions. Really, why couldn’t God give us a thoughtful inspiration? After all, He created our minds. God will never give us a thought that is contradictory to His word or character, but His way is always the best way.

God can speak to us through other believers. Often this can confirm our prayers and should always align with His word.

God wants to talk to us. His ways are the best. His plans for us are the best, and He is more than willing to reveal Himself to us.




Just as the Lord has forgiven you, so you are also to forgive (Col 3:13b).

Forgiveness is such a complicated issue. In Luke 17:4 Jesus says, “Even if that person wrongs you seven times a day and each time turns again and asks forgiveness, you must forgive.” But what if you have been treated unjustly and he doesn’t ask for forgiveness? In Matthew Jesus didn’t use “asks for forgiveness” as a qualifier. He said, “I tell you, [forgive] not seven times, but seventy times seven” meaning to forgive the same limitless amount of times that God forgave us.

Now God not only forgives, but He also forgets. He has removed our sins as far from us as the east is from the west. We humans can choose to forgive, but forgetting is not easy. Often a strong or painful emotion like anger, hurt, or sorrow is attached to the situation. It’s like a bruise that we thought was healed but when bumped, the pain returns.

Only God can detach the emotion from the recall of the negative situation. It is a spiritual issue that can only be neutralized, resolved and healed by the Divine Physician.

The Word

A little different format today—I have been studying Psalm 119 which mainly concerns the Word of God. I’m sure that God was intentional about its importance in making it the longest chapter in the Bible. Today, rather than focusing on one verse, I’d like to comment on just a few of the many profound verses in this chapter. Feel free to add your comments, too.

(5) Oh, that my actions would consistently reflect your decrees!—We can’t do it in our own power and, as I said before, even the apostle, Paul said that he sometimes did things that he hated. Can you imagine what our world would be like if we all could accomplish this!

(11) I have hidden your word in my heart that I might not sin against you.—If we are feeding our hearts the Bread of Life, our actions are more apt to follow.

(18) Open my eyes that I might see wonderful things in your law.–The Living Translation says, “…the wonderful truths in your instructions.” Either way, this is a great prayer to God to open out hearts to absorb His ways.

(24) Your statutes are my delight; they are my counselors.—The advice of well-meaning family or other believers are only relevant if they coincide with God’s word and the Spirit speaking directly to us through our prayers.

(98) Your commands make me wiser than my enemies.—Unlike David, my enemies don’t often appear in human form, rather they are temptations, or self-doubt, or pride. God’s word contains principles that enable us to deal with these enemies, too.

(130) The unfolding of your word gives light; it gives understanding to the simple.—The wisdom from God’s word is more meaningful and appropriate that even the most naïve, unsophisticated, uneducated can be wiser than the world’s most knowledgeable and brilliant scholar.

And finally as a prayer

(133) Direct my footsteps according to your word—let no sin rule over me.

To The Next Generation

Even when I’m old and gray…let me proclaim your power to the next generation, your mighty miracles to all who came after me (Ps 71:18).

One of our most important jobs in this life is to pass on HIS story, the message of truth of the mighty power and saving grace of Christ Jesus, to the next generation.

When my children left home for college, marriage, or life on their own, I gave much thought as to whether or not we had prepared them enough—would they eat too many fast foods because they couldn’t cook, or mix whites with their jeans, or balance a checkbook, or, or, or.

Really they could survive in the world without knowing all these skills as long as they know who to go to. What better go-to person than the Creator, the One who designed the world, and the One who formed each unique person. He is there for the major hurdles, and He is there for the little things too.

In the Old Testament, God’s people built altars so that when their children inquired about them, they could tell the story of how God worked in their lives. I have seen Him work miraculously in my own life, especially in regard to His perfect timing, and I have never met a believer who doesn’t have a personal story.

Sharing our own stories of God’s miracles is really giving the next generation a gift much better than the heftiest trust fund—it’s sharing hope.

Taste and See

Taste and see that the Lord is good; blessed is the one who takes refuge in Him (Ps 34:8)

The word “taste” appears a few times in connection with the goodness of God in both the Old and New Testaments. God’s choice of words is never random, but each is meaningful and carefully chosen.

As I thought about this, I concluded that our sense of taste is the most complicated. It works in connection with other senses including smell– aroma and also touch–texture. Though we may try, a taste is most difficult to explain in words. It can only be described by comparing it to another taste–like chicken (sorry, I couldn’t help myself). So it is with the goodness of God. There is no comparison; it must be discovered, experienced, and acknowledged.

God’s goodness is complete—totally satisfying, sufficient to meet our every need.

The challenge isn’t going back for a second helping, but to park there and bask in the Lord’s provision as this verse concludes, blessed is the one who takes refuge in Him.

The Father’s Love

For God so loved the world that He gave His one and only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life (John 3:16). 

A short time ago, the message at our church impacted me so much that even though I may not do it justice in these few words, I would be remiss for not sharing and will prayerfully try.

Although God’s word never goes out and returns void, I chose a verse that even non-believers can quote. John 3:16 is so commonly used, the depths of its meaning has been lost.

How many of us as loving parents would choose to suffer pain, emotional hurt, or even death rather than see our child experience it? The anguish suffered by that parent is often more excruciating than the physical pain.

Our loving Father gave us His most precious, precious gift. His only be-loved Son was sent from a heavenly paradise to live on earth for the sole purpose of assuming our sins on His perfect humanity in order to pay the penalty for what we did. As a parent, the depths of His pain would have to be immeasurably greater than if the Father could do it Himself.

And then, because God cannot be in the presence of sin, the already grieving Father had to turn away from the Son. Many parents cannot even leave a child’s hospital bed to eat or sleep, but the Father, who is the very definition of love, had to for a time abandon the Son. He could not complete His purpose if “the cup passed” from Him.

Can there be any greater love than to give His Son–His dearly loved child?

The depths of this love story can only be matched by the joyous ending. Sin and eternal death are defeated. We are redeemed by the most costly price imaginable—the Father’s love.

His Perfect Work

Before the cock crows twice, you will deny Me thrice (Mark14:30).

 Each time I hear the story of Peter’s denial I always surmise that I would never do that! But think about it—it seemed like everyone turned against Jesus. Talk about peer pressure. And speaking of peers, where were all the people that Jesus healed? And where were the other eleven? And who am I kidding?!

It’s easy to credit God in the midst of blessings or when I’m surrounded by other believers.

But when things aren’t going the way I think they should, or when it seems like other believers have scattered and are doing their own thing, or when I’m alone, am I still trusting? Or do I find myself in Peter’s situation asking, “Where is God? This isn’t the way this should play out.”

Do I still acknowledge that He loves me and is working on a “bigger picture”? I really don’t need to see further than my next step because even though I can’t grasp the whole picture, I can trust Him. And even when I deny Him, He is still faithful to complete His perfect work…even in me.